Veterinary Services in Evansville, IN

At Animal Medical Services, we’re pleased to offer the following services for our patients.

Parasite Control

The Animal Medical Services team is here to keep your pet protected! We will work with you to tailor a preventive plan that works best for your pet’s health care needs. Parasites, and the diseases they carry, can all be prevented with proper medication and maintenance. Fleas and ticks are not only a source of irritation to your pet, but they can also harbor disease and adversely affect your pet’s health. Heartworm is a dangerous parasite that lives in the heart of dogs and cats, damages the heart muscle, and can be fatal.

Diet and Nutrition Consultations

An estimated 59% of cats and 54% of dogs in the United States are overweight or obese. Good nutrition and weight management are key to your pet’s overall health.

We will help you create healthy eating habits for your pets. These healthy habits are created at a young age for your pet and it’s up to you to help them maintain these habits. Through a good diet and proper exercise, you greatly increase your pet’s chance at a long, healthy life.

Dentistry

According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, 70% of adult cats and 80% of adult dogs show symptoms of oral disease? Don’t let your pets become part of this statistic! In addition to brushing your pet’s teeth at home, we also recommend scheduling them for regular dental cleanings in our office.

Just as it’s important for you to see a dentist regularly, it’s important for dogs and cats as well. Your pet’s oral health is directly connected to their overall health. Signs of dental disease include bad breath, loose, broken or missing teeth, yellow or brown teeth, red, inflamed or bleeding gums, difficulty or pain when chewing, pawing at the mouth, and excessive drooling. If you notice any of these symptoms, please contact our team and we’ll be happy to help.

Signs of dental problems:

  • Bad breath
  • Loose, broken or missing teeth
  • Yellow or brown teeth
  • Pawing at the mouth
  • Excessive drooling
  • Red, inflamed or bleeding gums
  • Difficulty or pain when chewing
Grooming

Pamper your pets with a day at the spa! We offer professional grooming services at Animal Medical Services.

Level 1: $54.58

American Eskimo Spitz, Bichon Frise, Cairn Terrier, Cocker Spaniel, Dachshund, Lhasa Apso, Maltese, Ocherese, Peek-a-poo, Pekingese, Pomeranian, Poodle (Toy & Min), Min. Schnauzer, Scottish Terrier, Shih Tzu, Westie, Yorkie, Mixes of above

Level 2: $60.65

Brittany Spaniel, English Springer Spaniel, Samoyed, Sheltie, Mixes of Above, ALL CATS

Level 3: $66.71

Keeshonds, Mixes of similar size and/or with similar hair texture

Level 4: $72.77

Afghan, Bearded Collie, Border Collie, Standard Poodle, Giant Schnauzer, Schnoodles, Mixes of similar size

Level 5: $78.84

Airedale, Small collie, Mixes of similar size

Level 6:  $90.97

Golden Retriever, Goldendoodles, Husky, Mixes of similar size

Level 7: $103.09

Collie, German Shepard (Shear down), Old English Sheepdog, Mixes of similar size

Level 8: $115.22

Chow, Great Pyrenees, Newfoundland, St. Bernard, Mixes of similar sizes

Soft Tissue Surgery

Our team performs a variety of soft tissue surgeries. The most common soft tissue surgeries are spays, neuters, and mass removals. Other soft tissue surgeries may be for a variety of reasons, such as removal of foreign bodies from the GI tract, removal of bladder stones, and repair of damaged structures. With our state-of-the-art monitoring equipment, our team ensures our patients are safe and well cared for during their procedure.

In-House Laboratory

Pamper your pets with a day at the spa! We offer professional grooming services at Animal Medical Services.

Level 1: $54.58

American Eskimo Spitz, Bichon Frise, Cairn Terrier, Cocker Spaniel, Dachshund, Lhasa Apso, Maltese, Ocherese, Peek-a-poo, Pekingese, Pomeranian, Poodle (Toy & Min), Min. Schnauzer, Scottish Terrier, Shih Tzu, Westie, Yorkie, Mixes of above

Level 2: $60.65

Brittany Spaniel, English Springer Spaniel, Samoyed, Sheltie, Mixes of Above, ALL CATS

Level 3: $66.71

Keeshonds, Mixes of similar size and/or with similar hair texture

Level 4: $72.77

Afghan, Bearded Collie, Border Collie, Standard Poodle, Giant Schnauzer, Schnoodles, Mixes of similar size

Level 5: $78.84

Airedale, Small collie, Mixes of similar size

Level 6:  $90.97

Golden Retriever, Goldendoodles, Husky, Mixes of similar size

Level 7: $103.09

Collie, German Shepard (Shear down), Old English Sheepdog, Mixes of similar size

Level 8: $115.22

Chow, Great Pyrenees, Newfoundland, St. Bernard, Mixes of similar sizes

Referral Services

We want your pets to receive the best care possible. That’s why sometimes we will refer you to a specialist. We only refer to specialists we know and trust to take care of your pets at a level only they can provide.

Behavior Counseling

Don’t let your pet’s bad behavior be a cause for concern. We know how a poorly behaved pet can drive a wedge in your peaceful daily life. If you have questions or behavior issues, we’re here to help you address and correct them so you and your companions can continue a life full of good behavior.

End of Life Care

We will be here for you and your pets throughout every stage of their life, even the tough end-of-life decisions. Our compassionate team will help guide you through this difficult time to provide comfort and care through the end of life and aftercare process.

Emergency and Urgent Care

We have a veterinarian and personnel on duty during our regular business hours who are trained and equipped to handle urgent or emergency care for your pet.  Emergencies can be things such a snail bait poisoning, hit by a car, and chocolate ingestion. If you ever feel that your pet needs emergency treatment do not hesitate to call or come in immediately. If possible it is best to call before coming in so that a team member can advise you on your particular emergency.

AFTER-HOURS EMERGENCY CARE- Call the All Pet Emergency Clinic at 422-3300.

We are also available when we reopen for urgent care when the condition is not life-threatening, but you feel your pet needs to be seen before you are able to get an appointment. Our veterinarians will work to “squeeze” you in between scheduled appointments. When you arrive, our receptionists will be able to give you an estimate of how long you may have to wait in order to be seen.

Diagnostics

We are pleased to offer the following diagnostic capabilities:

1. In house lab for blood and urine testing.

2. In house Serological testing for Heartworm Disease, Lyme Disease, Ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, Feline Heartworm Disease, Feline Leukemia, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

3. Computed Radiology (X-rays) that include capabilities for dental radiographs.

4. Endoscopy (a flexible telescope for gastrointestinal and respiratory issues).

5. Diagnostic ultrasound.

6. MedRx Imaging machine for nasal, oral, and otological (ear) exams. This machine is also used for flushing ears.

7. Utilization of outside laboratories, such as those in Indianapolis and at Purdue University. This includes consultation with veterinary professionals at these facilities.

Anesthesia

The operating room at Animal Medical Service is equipped with technology similar to what is used at human hospitals. Our team monitors your pet during the entire surgery to ensure safe anesthesia.

We monitor your pet’s oxygen level, heart rate, EKG, temperature, CO2 level, and blood pressure.

Pre-Anesthesia:

The Pre-Anesthetic Blood Tests involve a group of tests that give us a broad view of what is going on in the pet at the time the blood is taken. In combination with the physical examination, we can assess the patient’s anesthetic risk and make modifications in the anesthetic plan if needed. In other cases, potentially life-threatening conditions can be detected that must be addressed before anesthesia can be safely induced. 

Complete Blood Count 
Called the “CBC” this allows for an evaluation of the three cell populations in the blood— the red blood cells (RBCs), the white blood cells (WBCs), and the platelets. The RBCs are responsible for getting oxygen to the tissues of the body. Deficiencies or “anemia” can slow the healing process. The WBCs play a major role in the body’s defense system, fighting off infections. Abnormalities can indicate an infection or an increased susceptibility to infection post-operatively. Lower than normal platelet counts generally mean a slower than normal clot time. In surgeries, this is simply critical.

Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) 
The “ALT” is an enzyme found in liver cells. Elevations indicate liver cell damage. Many of the anesthetics used in veterinary medicine must leave the body after being broken down by the liver cells. If enough of the liver cells are damaged, the anesthetic risk increases.

Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) and Creatinine
“BUN” is produced in the liver and is removed from the body by the kidneys. Lower than normal levels are seen in some liver diseases while high levels are features of dehydration or kidney disease. Chemicals that are produced by the breakdown of the anesthetics may also require this pathway to get out of the body. Creatinine also is a kidney test. Elevations can increase anesthetic and surgery risk for the patient.

Blood  Glucose
High blood glucose values are seen in diabetes or, especially in cats coming to the veterinary clinic, stress. As the primary energy substance in the blood, low levels affect healing and anesthetic recovery.  

Boarding and Daycare

We’re pleased to be your pet’s home away from home. While you’re away, you can rest assured that your pets are in good hands with our veterinary-supervised boarding. Our team is here to provide your companions with love, care, and attention second to none while they stay with us.

We are pleased to offer veterinarian supervised boarding at Animal Medical Services. This service is offered primarily for our clients who own dogs and cats. Other animals, such as small mammals, birds, and reptiles can also be boarded, but the boarding policy surrounding those animals will not be addressed here and you should call Dr. Butler directly for this information.

While our clients are given top priority, non-client animals can also be boarded with the approval of one of our veterinarians. We will require up to date vaccination and medical history for these boarders.

Prices:

Feline (all weights): $7.82/day (daycare); $11.15/night (boarding)
Canine <20 lbs: $7.53/day (daycare); $13.37/night (boarding) Canine 21-40 lbs: $7.82/day (daycare); $14.51/night (boarding) Canine 41-80 lbs: $8.09/day (daycare); $15.62/night (boarding) Canine 81-100 lbs: $8.37/day (daycare); $16.73/night (boarding) Canine >101 lbs: $9.20/day (daycare); $17.84/night (boarding)

Boarding for non-client animals quoted on availability. Boarding spots around major holidays are held for client animals until 48 hours before the start of the holiday period. Call office for info on Boarding for reptiles, birds, and small mammals.

Boarding Policy:

All dogs that are boarded will be up to date on the following vaccinations or they are updated on arrival here:

  • Rabies
  • Distemper-hepatitis-parainfluenza-parvo (lepto included on adult dogs)
  • Bordetella
  • Canine Influenza

All cats that are boarded will be up to date on the following vaccinations or they are updated on arrival here:

  • Rabies
  • Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis-Calicivirus-Panleukopenia

Pets here over five days will have a routine boarding fecal exam done. Pets over 6 years of age and here over 5 days will also have a urinalysis checked if a sample can be collected.

Items brought in with pets should be few in number. We will make every attempt to return these items to you.

We reserve the right to refuse boarding of any animal where its handling could result in harm to the caretaker or the pet itself. We also reserve the right to refuse boarding any animal that is destructive to our facility or is deemed a hazard to our staff.

Patient Monitoring

We are pleased to offer the following diagnostic capabilities:

1. In house lab for blood and urine testing.

2. In house Serological testing for Heartworm Disease, Lyme Disease, Ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, Feline Heartworm Disease, Feline Leukemia, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus,

3. Computed Radiology (X-rays) that include capabilities for dental radiographs.

4. Endoscopy (a flexible telescope for gastrointestinal and respiratory issues.

5. Diagnostic ultrasound.

6. MedRx Imaging machine for nasal, oral, and otological (ear) exams. This machine is also used for flushing ears.

7. Utilization of outside laboratories, such as those in Indianapolis and at Purdue University. This includes consultation with veterinary professionals at these facilities.

Microchip Identification

About 1 in 3 pets will go missing at some point in their lifetime. A permanent way to ensure the best chance of reuniting with your companion is with a microchip. Microchipping can offer reassurance that, if lost, animal shelters and veterinarians can identify your pet. A tiny microchip is placed under the skin between your pet’s shoulder blades. The microchip has an identification number on it, which can be read by a scanner. A veterinarian’s office or animal shelter can scan the chip to find out who owns the animal.

Pharmacy

Whether your pet is in need of a prescription medication or diet, you won’t have to go far. Our in-house pharmacy allows you to fill your pet’s prescriptions during your appointment so you don’t have to spend time waiting.

We also have an online pharmacy which allows you to shop for your pet’s food and medication online and have it shipped right to your door.

Computer-Generated Radiology

Radiology, or x-rays, is an important diagnostic tool that we use at Animal Medical Services. We use computer-generated radiographs for faster image processing so we can quickly and accurately diagnose your companion.

Types of Pets Seen

While both doctors offer care for dogs and cats, Dr. Butler adds his extensive experience with other animals such as birds, reptiles, pocket small mammals, rabbits, and ferrets.

Senior Pet Care

The Animal Medical Services team will be here for you and your pet throughout every life stage.

Canine Senior Care

Canine senior pet care often requires very diligent communication between pet caretakers and the veterinarian. No two cases are alike and when an owner observes a change in their pet, no question is a “silly” one. We want to remain on top of the situation to give our pets the highest quality of life.

Wellness examinations are recommended every 6 months. The old adage of one year in the life of a pet equaling seven years in a human may no longer be true, but it certainly is not a one to one ratio. It is a one to five ratio, so seeing the vet twice annually is the equivalent to you and I seeing the doctor every 2.5 years. A lot can happen and a lot can go wrong in that time frame. So we encourage wellness examinations every 6 months.

Routine vaccinations are as important for senior pets as for younger pets. As pets age, their immune systems are not as strong as earlier in life. For this reason we suggest the following:

  • Annual – DHLPP (Distemper, Hepatitis, Leptospirosis, Parainfluenza, Parvo Virus, and Corona Virus) and Canine Influenza.
  • Semi-annual –  Bordetella
  • Every 3 years – Rabies vaccine (this is the only vaccination required by law in our state.)

While clinical signs appear with illness, laboratory evaluations can detect those diseases BEFORE the pet becomes ill. Routine blood tests are important in any age group but these tests are often the difference between a “good” quality of life and a “bad” one in these patients.

  • Heartworm test and administration of heartworm preventive all year.
  • Fecal examination for intestinal parasites twice annually
  • Pets over 6 years of age should have annual blood work including a complete blood count and a chemistry panel.
  • Thyroid check for large breeds susceptible to hypothyroidism.
  • Nutrition – the feeding of complete and balanced pet food is important, too. Table scraps should be minimized and never include high fat items or pork.

Management of aging issues:

Arthritis often occurs in our aging pets. Medications are available to help maintain a good quality of life. It is important to remember that these medications DO NOT INCLUDE many of the drugs in your medicine cabinet that you might take for arthritis.

Weight management is perhaps the most significant issue in elderly patients. With age, activity decreases. If diets remain the same, all of these pets will gain weight which puts extra stresses on the heart, lungs, and joints. Free choice feeding, while convenient for owners, is often not in the best interest of our pets.

Dental health promotes higher quality of life, better nutrition, and better appetites. Often bad teeth and gums can lead to kidney and liver disease. We suggest a dental examination with teeth cleaning every 12-18 months. As there can be early dental disease that we cannot see, a set of full mouth dental radiographs are an important addition to the healthcare program.

Behavior changes in aged pets can be the tip-off to disease. As hearing and vision decrease, pets can startle easily and can tend to seek out their favorite human or animal companions for comfort. When those companions are not found, separation anxiety can lead to injury or destruction of property.

Management of the behavior in the face of storms or fireworks and separation anxiety treatment are often significant in older pets.

Cognitive dysfunction is a form of dementia in older pets. Behavior changes, loss of training habits, and disruptions to normal behavior routines such as inappropriate urination or defecation should be monitored and reported to the veterinarian.

Feline Senior Care

Feline senior pet care often requires very diligent communication between pet caretakers and the veterinarian. No two cases are alike and when an owner observes a change in their pet, no question is a “silly” one. We want to remain on top of the situation to give our pets the highest quality of life.

Wellness examinations are recommended every 6 months. As cats do not live the 70 or so years of their owners, changes in their health occur sooner. The sooner diagnoses are made, the faster treatment can be started and the more successful that treatment can be for the pet.

Routine vaccinations are as important for senior pets as for younger pets. As pets age, their immune systems are not as strong as earlier in life. For this reason we suggest the following:

  • Annual – FVRCP (Feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, and panleukopenia) vaccine, Feline Leukemia Vaccine (* see below in lab section)
  • Every 3 years – Rabies vaccine (this is the only vaccination required by law in our state.)

While clinical signs appear with illness, laboratory evaluations can detect those diseases BEFORE the pet becomes ill. Routine blood tests are important in any age group but these tests are often the difference between a “good” quality of life and a “bad” one in these patients.

  • Fecal examination for intestinal parasites twice annually
  • Pets over 6 years of age should have annual blood work including a complete blood count and a chemistry panel.
  • Feline FIV and Feline Leukemia testing should be done early with annual vaccination in cats negative for Leukemia.
  • Nutrition: the feeding of complete and balanced pet food is important, too.  Table scraps should be minimized and never include high-fat items or pork.

Management of aging issues:

Arthritis – Often less obvious in cats, arthritis does occur and can be effectively managed. However, medications that humans take for this condition are often toxic and even deadly in cats.

Weight management is perhaps the most significant issue in elderly feline patients.  With age, activity decreases.  If diets remain the same, all of these pets will gain weight which puts extra stresses on the heart, lungs, and joints.  Free choice feeding, while convenient for owners, is often not in the best interest of our pets.

Dental health for cats promotes higher quality of life, better nutrition, and better appetites.  Often bad teeth and gums can lead to organ diseases such as kidney and liver issues. We suggest a dental examination with teeth cleaning every 12-18 months.  As there can be an early dental disease that we cannot see, a set of full mouth dental radiographs are an important addition to the health care program.

Behavior changes in aged pets can be the tip-off to disease. 

Cognitive dysfunction is a form of dementia in older pets. Behavior changes, loss of training habits, and disruptions to normal behavior routines such as inappropriate urination or defecation should be monitored and reported to the veterinarian.

Compassionate Veterinary Care in Evansville, IN.

At Animal Medical Services, we're dedicated to providing exceptional client service and veterinary health care for the pets of Evansville, Mount Vernon, Henderson, Newburgh, and beyond!

Contact Us

Phone: 812-423-2000 (Call or Text)
Fax: 812-423-2645
Email: info@amsvet.com

Location

2918 Mt. Vernon Avenue
Evansville, IN 47712
Click here for directions.

Hours

Mon - Fri: 7:00 am - 5:30 pm
Sat: 8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Sun: Closed

Have a question?

Get in touch! Our team is here to help. If you're in need of immediate assistance, please contact us directly at 812-423-2000.

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